Home Remedies for Dog’s Urinary Tract Infection

By isak, June 6, 2009

How can I tell if my pet has UTI? One of the first warning signs of cat or dog urinary tract infection might be some straining, pain or discomfort when urinating, but any change in urinary habits could signal UTI.

Watch out for incontinence or increased frequency of urination, the ability to pass only a very small or an abnormally large amount of urine, and urination in inappropriate places. Cats often stop using the litter box altogether to urinate. Other symptoms may include the passing of urine which is cloudy or strong in odor, an increased thirst, and visible inflammation or irritation. Symptoms which may indicate UTI (but could also be signs of other illness) include lethargy, loss of appetite, vomiting, fever and back pain.

What can I do about it? Urinary tract infection in dogs can be a recurring phenomenon and it might tire you to constantly take your dog to the vet. Consequently, you may wonder if a dog’s urinary tract infection can be treated with a homemade formula. Fortunately, a dog’s UTI can be treated from the comfort of home. Make sure, though, that the dog’s condition is not severe. If it is, it is highly advised that instead of giving the animal homemade treatment, you take it to the vet for proper diagnosis and appropriate medical treatment.

Urinary tract infection does not pose a life-threatening risk to dogs. Thus, you may address the problem yourself in your home. There are several homemade remedies that are effective in treating a dog’s UTI. Some of these remedies are listed below.

1. Frequent bathing. Bathing your pet frequently can help prevent the recurrence or spread of bacteria that are causing complications. Bathing the dog frequently can help flush out bacteria that may invade its urinary system through the opening of the urethra.

2. Citrus juices. If your dog is suffering from UTI, you can give it citrus juices such as orange juice, lime juice, and cranberry juice. These can help boost the acid level of the dog’s urine.

3. Apple cider vinegar. This has properties which can neutralize the bacteria present in the dog’s urine, reducing the discomfort caused by the disease to the pet. You can give the animal apple cider vinegar by mixing it in water.

4. Clean water. Give your dog ample amount of clean water everyday. This can help wash out the bacteria that have accumulated in the canine’s urine. In the process, the infection may be lessened.

Aside from the remedies listed above, you may also give your dog herbal remedies and homeopathic remedies. These remedies have been shown to have wonderful effects in dogs suffering from UTI and other urinary problems. These remedies cannot only help cure the UTI in your dog; these likewise prevent the recurrence of the disease. Herbal and homeopathic remedies are also safe because they do not have side effects that may add to the discomfort and pain felt by the pet.

If you are going to use herbal and homeopathic remedies in treating a dog’s urinary tract infection, especially look for products which have uva ursi, staphysagris, berberis vulgaris, golden rod, juniper berry, and cantharis as ingredients. These ingredients have properties which can help soothe the dog’s bladder, relieve the inflammation, and ultimately strengthen the bladder. Prolonged use of these remedies can help keep ypur dog in top shape by preventing the recurrence of infections.

Urinary tract infection is truly a rising problem in today’s society. However, you can help keep your dog safe from infections by giving it home remedies. It is still very essential, though, that you take your pet to the vet regularly for check-up. By doing so, occurrence of infections can be detected and dealt with earlier.

……………………………………………………………………………….
Melissa Simmonds is a dog health enthusiast. She has done much research in the hope of finding ways of treating a dog’s urinary tract infection She has learned from her research that a dog’s UTI can be treated with homemade remedies.

Article Source: Melissa_Simmonds

MORE INFO

Cranberry Extract is high in Vitamin C and prevents bacteria from adhering to the bladder wall. Women who drink a pint of juice a day had 63% reduction in recurrence of urinary tract infections. And YES YOU CAN GIVE IT TO YOUR PETS!!!! One 3000 mg capsule is equivalent to 24 ounces of cranberry juice.

Dosing schedule: 1/8 capsule for cats & small dogs, ¼ capsule for medium dogs, ½ capsule for large dogs and 1 capsule for giant breed dogs. Give THREE times a day.

From the Antietam Valley Animal Hospital‘s newsletter

Guidelines for Use: Cranberry has no known interactions with antibiotics or other medications. But by acidifying the urine, cranberry may lessen the effect of another herb sometimes used for UTIs called uva ursi (also known as bearberry). Try one or the other.

189 Comments

  1. Teena says:

    Dear Isak,

    Thank you so much for getting back to me and your advice regarding the fish oil.

    We have taken Megy off the loxicom and decided to give her the pardale alone as you suggested however it is a nightmare trying to get Megy to take the pardale as she finds it very unpalatable and so we wondered if perhaps there was a more palatable pain killer for treating pain whilst maintaining the efficacy of pardale, please?

    We have already tried first thing this morning the cat food as you suggest and she ate a little which was encouraging. We also tried the pardale in this also but no luck as she has become so cute to the fact we are trying to disguise it and she hates it…! We are cooking the menu from recipe one as I write and looking forward very much to seeing her eat something that we now know will be beneficial for her and we will keep you posted.

    We cannot thank you enough for the generosity of your time, help and advice. Thank you Teena

    • isak says:

      You would need to check with your vet to see if there is an alternative to pardale. Have you tried wrapping it in cheese — those individual slices you use to make grilled cheese sandwiches? The cheese is kind of sticky and can make it so dogs can’t spit out the pill. Glad to hear the cat food worked, even a little. I hope the home cooking was a hit, too!

  2. Teena says:

    Dear Isak,

    Thank you so much for your kind and very prompt reply. We did take Megy to a specialist referral and it was there that the diagnosis was made from the ultra scan & xray. We were told it was a transient cell carcinoma and that it was very advanced. We did consider the biopsy of course for a definite diagnosis but were told that it was highly inlikely to yield any additional information. My instinct was to have the facts however when you are faced with professionals who think that because your treasured pet is 15 years old, that you should do the decent thing, give your pet a cuddle and say goodbye…., and this unfortunately is the prevailing attitude of practitioners in this country, it is so difficult to take a stand when you are looked upon as a crazy freak so bucking the trend….! Even the fact that we asked for a scan made us feel guilty that we were going beyond the cultural norm and putting Megy through unnecessary procedures…!

    Sorry for ranting but we are limited in our options for a second opinion…! We do however intend taking her off the loxicom and sticking with the pardale as you suggest. Megy is 14.5 kg and we have been told 3 pardales per day is the maximum we can give. Can you suggest an alternative which maybe more palatable please?

    Thank you very much for the recipes for kidney failure and we will try this immediately. In recipe one there is the addition of fish oil, is this ok to use when Megy has pancreatitis?

    Many thanks again for your great help, prompt and detailed reply. You are very kind.

    Teena

    • isak says:

      It doesn’t matter what practitioners think. It’s what you feel and what you need so that you understand all your options. It does seem that sometimes people diminish the value of a life when that life speaks a different language, but our life is the only thing in this world that is genuinely ours. It certainly deserves respect and care.

      Fish body oil, such as salmon oil or EPA oil (not cod liver oil), may seem counterintuitive at first, because of its high fat content, but it can actually help lower blood lipid levels (both triglycerides and cholesterol). Studies have also found it to be beneficial in treating acute pancreatitis, while its effects on chronic pancreatitis are unknown. When supplementing with fish body oil, also supplement with vitamin E.

      What are you looking for an alternative to? The lexicom?

What do you think?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *